More Cocky Trademarks: Weird Stuff

More Cocky Trademarks: Weird Stuff

I’ve already draft seven more posts about how the cocky trademarks popping up might give everyone a hard time in the near future. The research alone is draining. I don’t want to spend much time on post headers for each announcement of these ridiculous-appearing trademark applications. You’re going to see repeats or nothing in header images (source: Pixabay) until I can catch up with news. Okay?


The application is by William M. Gaines, Agent, Inc for two words that can be used to describe any collection of books or artistic styles.https://tsdr.uspto.gov/img/87960776/large?1529361565883The company is applying to trademark this phrase for:

Printed matter; paper, cardboard and goods made from these materials, not included in other classes; artist’s materials; series of fiction works, namely, novels, books, comics, and magazines, Entertainment; education; providing of training; sporting and cultural activities; Precious metals and their alloys; jewellery, precious and semi-precious stones; horological and chronometric instruments; Leather and imitations of leather; animal skins and hides; luggage and carrying bags; umbrellas and parasols; walking sticks; whips, harness and saddlery; collars, leashes and clothing for animals; clothing, headgear, footwear; Games, toys and playthings; video game apparatus; gymnastic and sporting articles; decorations for Christmas trees

What is they doing? As far as I can tell, the company is burying their intentions in word muck.

William M. Gaines, Agent, Inc. also applied to trademark “WEIRD SCIENCE”. Both claims are for standard character marks, not a particular word mark, which is like an image of the phrase. The company is saying it owns the phrase for the following uses. The bolding is mine.

paper, cardboard and goods made from these materials, not included in other classes; artist’s materials; Entertainment; education; providing of training; sporting and cultural activities; Precious metals and their alloys; jewellery, precious and semi-precious stones; horological and chronometric instruments; Leather and imitations of leather; animal skins and hides; luggage and carrying bags; umbrellas and parasols; walking sticks; whips, harness and saddlery; collars, leashes and clothing for animals; clothing, headgear, footwear; Games, toys and playthings; video game apparatus; gymnastic and sporting articles; decorations for Christmas trees, electronic publications; Printed matter, series of fiction works, namely, novels, books, comics, and magazines

Just… it just seems as if they have competition.

What’s the most weird is that these trademark applications appear to be a claim by a dead creator to merchandise a 65-year-old comic series titles.

EC Comics and Weird Lines

William M. Gaines, Agent, Inc. is using the name of the writer, editor, and publisher of EC Comics, which ended its comics line in 1956. The comics were Weird Fantasy and Weird Science. Gaines passed away in 1992. I’m not sure how ownership of the comics titles passed along to the Agent, Inc. for sixty years.

Anyway, EC Comics might be best known for publishing the Tales from the Crypt books and the Mad magazine. I hadn’t heard of these Weird comics until digging into the history of the company.

Now there are unrelated anthologies, songs, at least one movie, and who knows what else that use “Weird Fantasy” or “Weird Science” in marketing. Are they going to disappear from Amazon this year, like what happened with books using “cocky”?

Does someone need to fight this?

My opinion on these trademark applications–until someone convinces me otherwise–is that protesting an innocent claim is better than allowing one to quietly slide through the insufficient review process.

How to Help Fight the Word Abuse

Are “Weird Fantasy” and “Weird Science” Part of CockyGate?

I can’t prove the people behind William M. Gaines, Agent, Inc. know of CockyGate but my guess is they definitely do. Yet they’re giving no reassurances that they won’t use their filings with the USPTO interfere with creators, who are already jittery? That is suspicious.


Please comment if you have relevant news or found this useful. Thanks for paying attention.

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